Alternatives & Traditional

The internet has made doing medical research so easy, but it has also opened the door to anyone making whatever dubious health claims they wish.

For example, I found a post on Curezone where a woman claimed to have multiple sclerosis (MS) that she assumed was from her amalgam fillings.  According to her story she had the amalgam fillings removed and replaced with gold.  She claims that within 10 days she had no more symptoms of MS.

So what is wrong with the story?  Plenty!

First of all MS is an autoimmune disease caused from a virus and adrenal dysfunction.  It has nothing to do with mercury.

Secondly, even if mercury was involved then the symptoms would not have cleared that quick since mercury is stored in fat tissues including the brain.  It would take a lot longer than 10 days to clear the mercury from the body.  Furthermore, anyone knowing how the body really works would have known that MS causes damage to the myelin that insulates the nerves causing the MS symptoms.  Even if the source of the MS is eliminated the lesions would have to be eliminated somehow and the myelin would have to be regenerated in order for the symptoms to disappear.  The lesions are basically scar tissue and are permanent.  Myelin will regenerate, but this can take many months to years.  For someone to claim that they were symptom free of MS in 10 days just proves beyond a reasonable doubt that the whole story was fabricated!

Despite the literal impossibilities of the story though there were still people buying I to the claims without question.

Another example I have made reference to in the past are the supposed “oleander soup testimonials” that keep getting posted on the internet on various sites.  One problem with these so-called “testimonials” is that there is no way to confirm if any of them are true to begin with.  I have always found it interesting that Dr. Ozel has supposedly cured thousands of patients using “oleander soup” but the same dozen or so “testimonials” are the only “evidence” being presented.  Where are these thousands of patients supposedly cured?  Why aren’t they all over the media praising Dr. Ozel’s name if they are still alive?  Instead, the way these “testimonials” are presented there is no way to confirm if the people really exist.  And if they do are they still alive?  What other therapies did they use in conjunction if any?  Did their cancers come back?

This is a major problem with “testimonials” on the internet.  Anyone can make up fake testimonials and put them up on the internet to mislead people in to thinking these were written by actual people who used the therapy and succeeded.  In fact, if you do a quick search on the internet you will find that there are even companies whose sole business is to write phony testimonials for products.

Therefore, are unverifiable testimonials proof of effectiveness?  Of course not.  But this tactic is used all the time, especially on the internet.  I gave an example in my previous blog post:

https://medreview.wordpress.com/2012/10/19/is-oleander-soup-for-cancer-a-scam-part-2-2/

in which Tony Isaacs claimed the studies showing oleander did not work against cancer failed because they were not conducted long enough.  According to Mr. Isaacs oleander takes at least several months to even start seeing results with oleander.  Yet, Mr. Isaacs keeps posting the same unverifiable “testimonials” that include a supposed complete remission of cancer in 12 days.  Such clear contradictions call all of the unverifiable claims in to question since both completely opposite claims cannot be true.

Don’t get me wrong, testimonials are wonderful.  But only if they are real to begin with and the facts can be verified to confirm a particular treatment is what actually worked.   They are not wonderful when they are too fantastic to be true and clearly contradict real evidence, such as every in vivo oleander study, which has shown it to be ineffective for cancer.

There used to be another poster on Curezone who went by the name Moreless that also touted all sorts of testimonials to his protocol, which included the ingestion of caustic calcium hydroxide.  If anyone questioned him or his dangerous claims they were immediately banned from his forum and were literally told they were Satan or the Satan’s disciples.  He was finally banned from Curezone for pulling stunts such as editing posts on his forum that disagreed with him or discussed the side effects and injuries people had to make the post appear they were agreeing with Moreless and the protocol was safe and effective.

I had a number of people contact me directly through private messages and e-mails discussing their injuries and even hospitalizations after following this protocol.  Of course these testimonials were erased immediately if they were reported on that forum so others would not find out how dangerous his advice really was.

Actually, if anyone looked in to his other claims they would have known better than to follow anything this person claimed.  Some of my favorite ridiculous claims being made by this person included:

  • Sunlight is acidic because it contains a lot of hydrogen.  The fact is that the sunlight does not have a pH.  Light consists of photons, which are elementary particles, not atoms.  Just because a neon light emits light this does not mean that light contains neon atoms.
  • That acidity would turn the tissues in to a “puddle of goo”.  He never did answer my question as to how the parts of the body that were naturally acidic had not dissolved into puddles of goo.  Or why someone running a marathon did not dissolve into a puddle of goo from the acidity generated during intense exercise.
  • That nitrogen is a protein.  Nitrogen is an atom and a diatomic gas, not a protein.
  • That there are subatomic minerals.  If minerals are made up of multiple full size atoms then how can a mineral be smaller than an individual atom?   It’s impossible.

Despite these and other totally ridiculous and dangerous claims made by Moreless he had a cult-like following.  At least in part as it was later revealed that Moreless was using different posting names to make it appear he had more followers than he actually had.  This also brings up the question of how many of the “testimonials” did Moreless fabricate to make his protocol appear effective?

In one post one of his followers claimed she was cured by the Moreless protocol.  But then in another post she wrote “Yes, I have had candida and MCS.  First the candida, then several years later after nothing I did to relieve it worked, very severe MCS.”

And:

“2 1/2 years on the Moreless protocol, getting better every day!!!”

So here was a “success testimonial” from a person who was admitting that after years on the Moreless protocol was still sick.

Isaacs and Moreless are only a couple of the people on Curezone presenting bogus information and giving dangerous advice.

These are just a few examples of some of the bogus, misleading and dangerous health advice I have seen on the internet.  I will be addressing other examples in future blog posts.  The point that was being made is that just because someone makes a health claim on the internet this does not automatically make it true and “testimonials” mean nothing unless the facts can be verified.

It may be nice and easier to just ask someone health advice rather than taking a little personal responsibility and researching the claims from credible sources to see if they are legitimate and safe.

This does not apply only to holistic medicines, but allopathic medicines as well.  I have seen so many people harmed by unnecessary medications and procedures because they did not question their doctors or research their conditions, medications or procedures.

For example, someone I know personally was put on Lasix (furosemide) for over 2 years without potassium, which is a major medical mistake.  Lasix (furosemide) drops potassium levels significantly causing heart arrhythmias.  Instead of giving him potassium though to prevent the side effect of the Lasix he was instead prescribed a very dangerous drug known as Amiodarone, which ended up causing iodine toxicity that has taken months for him to recover from.  All it would have taken to avoid the situation was a little simple research on the drugs to know that the Amiodarone was not necessary and the arrhythmias could have easily been prevented with the safer potassium that was being depleted by the Lasix.

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