Alternatives & Traditional

Posts tagged ‘blood sugar’

Medicinal Properties of Chaparral Part 1

If I made a list of my top 10 favorite herbs, chaparral (Larrea tridentata) would definitely be on that list.  This hardy plant, comprising over 20 species, cannot only survive the extremes of desert life, but can also live to be well over 10,000 years old.  In fact, I have read that one of the oldest living plants on earth is a massive chaparral plant in California believed to be over 25,000 years old.  Natural habitats for chaparral include the Southwestern US, Mexico, South America, South Africa, Australia and the Mediterranean.

Medicinally, chaparral is hard to beat.  The plant has strong antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-tumor properties.  Chaparral is also a great anti-inflammatory and raises vitamin C levels in the adrenal glands.  By strengthening the adrenals, inflammatory conditions are reduced in the body, stress responses are improved, immune function is strengthened, depression can be alleviated, blood sugar can be stabilized, allergies/asthma reduced, etc.  Chaparral is an extremely strong blood purifier, which is probably in part due to its high sulfur content.  Its sulfur content could also help explain its historical use as a hair growth agent.

In addition, chaparral is the strongest antioxidant I have seen.  Many antioxidant manufacturers claim that their antioxidant is the strongest known, but they are misleading.  For example, manufacturers of Pycnogenol claimed that they had the strongest antioxidant known.  They even went as far to compare the strength of their product to vitamin E.  The problem is that Pycnogenols, or PCOs, are water soluble.  Natural vitamin E on the other hand is lipid (fat) soluble.  This is like comparing a car to a bicycle.  They are both a source of transportation, but with big differences.  And if I were to compare Pycnogenols with vitamin E, I would say the vitamin E is the car, which is more powerful, and the Pycnogenols are the bicycle.  This is because I feel the cell membrane, which is composed of lipids is more prone to free radical damage than the components within the water portion of the cell.  Chaparral is different because it is not limited to the water or lipid portions of the cell.  The antioxidants in chaparral work in both parts of the cell.

The antioxidants in chaparral include flavonoids, and a very powerful antioxidant known as nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). NDGA is such a strong and effective antioxidant that it was actually used for decades as an antioxidant preservative for oils and foods, with full approval of the USDA.

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Herbs as Foods

I wonder what herbs and foods will be become prescription if the FDA gets its way to make all herbs and supplements prescription.  The FDA claims that anything in which a medical claim is made for, or that treats or mitigates a disease, or alters a function of the body is a drug and therefore under FDA regulation.  So what foods can be considered drugs and may be subject to prescription?:

Cinnamon- Shown to lower blood sugar.  Antiseptic.  Aids in digestion.

Oats- Lowers cholesterol.  As a fiber it helps regulate bowel movements and supplies silica to help in the formation of connective tissues.

Rice- Treats diarrhea.

Broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts- Contain antitumor agents.  Raw broccoli can slow down an overactive thyroid.

Peanuts- Raw peanuts will slow an overactive thyroid.

Soy- Regulates hormones.  Raw, unfermented soy treats overactive thyroid.

Watermelon- All parts of the watermelon are diuretic and helps treat constipation.

Garlic- Lowers blood pressure.

Onions- Lower blood sugar.  The skins of yellow onions contain quercetin, a natural antihistamine.

Rosemary- Antioxidant and antiseptic.

Oregano- Antiseptic.

Nopales- Lowers blood sugar.  Treats enlarged prostate and lowers cholesterol.

Grapes and raisins- Contain antiviral and antitumor polyphenols.

Green, oolong, and black teas- Contain antiviral and antitumor polyphenols.

Thyme- Antibacterial and antifungal.  Thyme oil can be used to treat thrush and toenail infections.

Basil- Strongly antiviral.  Basil oil kills the herpes virus and can be applied to cold sores to treat the outbreak.

Ginger- Shown in studies to be more effective than the pharmaceutical drug Dramamine in controlling motion sickness.  Ginger also treats inflammations and pain, improves digestion and is antiseptic.

Turmeric- Shown in studies to be highly antitumor, and antiseptic.

Apples- Help to control blood sugar and suppress the appetite.

Kiwi- Treats scurvy.

Citrus- Treats scurvy.  Contains the natural antihistamine quercetin.

Strawberries- Treats scurvy.  Contains antiviral polyphenols.  Mashed strawberries can be applied to cold sores to help kill the localized virus.

Blueberries- Treats scurvy.  Contains antiviral polyphenols.  Mashed blueberries can be applied to cold sores to help kill the localized virus.  Blueberries improve vision in cases of night blindness and can help prevent macular degeneration.

Brans- Treat constipation.

Olive oil- Lowers cholesterol.

Wheat germ oil- Can help prevent cataracts and improves energy.

Cocoa- Muscle relaxant due to high magnesium content.  Magnesium in cocoa can help lower blood pressure and reduces menstrual cramps.  Phenylethylamine (PEA) in cocoa is a psychoactive compound and antidepressant.  Cocoa butter added to make chocolate treats constipation.

Carrots- Helps improve vision and fight cancer.  Supports liver function and treats constipation.

Beets- The root improves liver function and treats iron deficiency anemia.  The leaves are a methyl donor that treats inflammations, heart disease and depression.

Yogurt- Treats irritable bowel syndrome and yeast infections.

It appears that if the FDA gets its way that we will have to carry a prescription pad with us just to eat.

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