Alternatives & Traditional

Posts tagged ‘Chlamydia’

Medicinal Properties of Chaparral Part 2

Chaparral is best known for its ability to treat cancer effectively.  The antitumor effects of chaparral have been verified in studies conducted by the universities of both Nevada and Utah.  One of the things that makes chaparral unique in its ability to treat cancer is the fact that it “attacks” the cancer through multiple mechanisms.  Since the majority of cancers have a microbial origin the first mechanism is through the destruction of viruses, bacteria and fungi.  Chronic inflammation has also been linked to the formation of cancers meaning that chaparral’s anti-inflammatory properties can inhibit some cancers.  Chaparral can inhibit cancers triggered, or aggravated, by free radicals and toxins due to its antioxidant and cleansing properties.  Chaparral’s liver cleansing properties makes it helpful for hormonal induced cancers since the liver is responsible for the breakdown of excess hormones.  And finally, chaparral inhibits mitochondrial enzymes, which in turn inhibits the cellular division of cancer cells.  In short, this means chaparral can inhibit cancer growth.

Chaparral’s ability to kill microbes makes it useful for a number of diseases linked to microbial infections.  These include cancers (viral, bacterial, and fungal forms), heart disease (chlamydia bacteria), hepatitis (viral, bacterial, and fungal forms), rheumatoid (chlamydia bacteria) and other forms of infectious arthritis, multiple sclerosis (human herpes virus type 6), ulcerative colitis (mycoavium complex bacterium), Crohn’s disease (mycoavium complex bacterium), type 1 diabetes (viral), pneumonia (viral, bacterial, and fungal forms), bronchitis (viral, bacterial, and fungal forms), etc.  One of the most interesting areas of study for the use of chaparral is in the treatment of herpes infections where studies are looking very promising.

Chaparral is very resinous and so is not easy to prepare as a tea.  Resins and water do not mix and the resin will separate out and stick to the pan wall when trying to make the tea.  Therefore, I recommend not using this herb as a tea.  I personally prefer the powder mixed with other herbs.  By combining the powder with other powdered herbs the other powdered herbs will help prevent the resins in the chaparral from clumping the powder in to a big “gumball” when it comes in to contact with water.  This helps maintain a larger surface area thereby increasing the absorption and effectiveness of the herb.  In addition, the addition of other herbs can increase the effectiveness of each herb . For instance, chaparral combined with red clover blossom increases the antitumor activity of both herbs.  Combining chaparral with pau d’ arco (lapacho, taheebo, ipe roxo) increases the antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities of both herbs.

Again, the FDA tried to claim that chaparral was linked to 13 cases of hepatitis though medical reviews subsequently found no evidence that the chaparral was linked to the cases.  In fact, it was shown that many of the patients were found to have pre-existing liver failure or were taking pharmaceutical drugs well known for causing liver damage.  On the other hand, fresh chaparral does contain unstable alkaloids that may damage the liver if ingested for a length of time.  Therefore, chaparral should be dried and aged several months before use to destroy these alkaloids.

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Safety of Megadosing Vitamin C Part 4

Copper, which is displaced by excess vitamin C is essential for the formation of hemoglobin that carries oxygen to the tissues, and removes carbon dioxide.  Iron is also essential for the formation of hemoglobin, although iron absorption is increased by vitamin C.  This all brings up an interesting problem.  If iron levels are increased by improved absorption from vitamin C but hemoglobin cannot be formed due to lack of copper, what happens to all the iron being absorbed?
As with copper and vitamin C, iron is essential for the body and serves various purposes.  Although, as with copper and vitamin C excess levels of iron can be dangerous.  And since the body has no efficient way of ridding itself of excess iron iron levels may easily build up to toxic levels.

As iron accumulates in the body it is primarily stored in organs and glands where it can lead to organ failure and glandular damage.  The heart, liver and pancreas are at the greatest risk of damage and failure from iron overload.

Side effects of iron overload include heart disorders, diabetes, cirrhosis of the liver, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, parathyroid damage resulting in low blood calcium, pituitary gland dysfunction, atrophy of the testes and ovaries, nervous system damage and disorders, arthritic disorders, graying or bronzing of the skin and decreased energy levels.  Numerous microbes and protozoa thrive with high iron levels.  These include Candida, Listeria, Chlamydia, Salmonella, Plasmodium, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Cryptococcus, Campylobacter, Pseudomonas, Helicobacter pylori Escherichia coli and numerous others.

Iron overload is also known to increase the risk of various cancers including liver cancer, Kaposi’s sarcoma, breast cancer, melanoma and colon cancer.  The increased risk of cancer is probably due to the increased activity of cancer pathogens.  For example, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been linked to several cancers including breast cancer, prostate cancer and skin cancer.  Human herpes virus type 8 has been linked to the viral form of Kaposi’s sarcoma.  Liver cancer has been linked to hepatitis viruses and aflatoxins from the fungus Aspergillus niger.

Arthritis may occur from iron overload due to two factors.  Oxidative destruction can lead to joint damage.  In addition, certain forms of arthritis are triggered from pathogens.  For example, rheumatoid arthritis has been linked to an infection with a form of Chlamydia bacteria.

Heart disease due to iron overload is generally believed to result from oxidative damage to the arterial lining, and to the heart muscle itself.  There may be a secondary factor though.  Scientists have found a link between Chlamydia bacteria and arteriosclerosis, which may lead to arrhythmias, angina and heart attack.

Excess levels of iron have also been found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.  As with the excessive aluminum levels found in the brains of Alzheimer’s  excessive iron levels have not been proven to be a cause of Alzheimer’s.  Although, it is hypothesized that the excessive level of iron may be causing oxidative damage to the brain leading to Alzheimer’s disease.

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